Who lived in my house?

The names and dates of the people who first lived in your house have been taken from the tax records and are now readable in a table. The records cover the years from 1816 to 1885 and show the order in which the houses were built, as well as the names of their occupiers. Click on the image of the first few lines of the table below or click here to see the table in full.

What number was my house to begin with?

All our houses were re-numbered in 1881 and the south side also previously in 1844. You can see which house number is yours by comparing the current numbers (shown on the top row of the table) with the original numbers (shown on the second row). The 1844 renumbering is marked in the table itself. Numbers one to nine were part of Molesworth Place, sometimes called Moleworth Place, which reached round the corner to Kentish Town Rd. Numbers 1, 2 and 3 Molesworth Place were redesignated as part of Kentish Town Road in 1863, with the rest of the houses becoming part of Jeffrey's St in 1881.

What kind of people lived here?

A family in 1816

A family in 1816

Middle class but not grand.

“The early streets of Camden Town … were laid out not with fine houses but with modest ones.” 

"Camden Town assumed a “resolutely lower middle class nature”. (Gillian Tindall - The Fields Beneath)

Gillian Tindall sums up that working class houses generally have a parlour on entering the house and a kitchen and scullery out the back. A middle class house, however modest, has a kitchen in the basement for staff to use.  Booth's famous poverty map shows the middling nature of Jeffreys Street.

A fashionable chap in 1816

A fashionable chap in 1816

Living so close to central London, our neighbours would have known what the latest fashions were. Even if they couldn't always afford the same. 

Living so close to central London, our neighbours would have known what the latest fashions were. Even if they couldn't always afford the same. 

1816 

1816 

1817

1817

Fashion started to change between 1816 and 1825 as the North side of the street was slowly being built and lived in.

Sisters in 1818

Sisters in 1818

1822

1822

A fashionable gentleman in 1825

A fashionable gentleman in 1825

1819

1819

1822

1822

As the South side of the street was built , mainly in 1825, the regency look became outdated, shoulder lines widened and empire lines started to drop towards the waist an preparation for the new Victorian era. 

 

The Victorians

To roughly summarise Gillian Tindall's The Fields Beneath, the coming of the noisy, dirty railway and its arches really changed our area. Our china cabinets would have been shaken by the constant thunder of steam trains passing close by.  

Back in 1816 Jeffreys Street had been quite aspirational.  Some living on Kentish Town Rd around the corner were even ‘independently wealthy’ or gentry. (From tax records).  By the late Victorian era our houses could be crowded with two families of perhaps hat makers and joiners, sometimes also with lodgers (from the census for no 19), rather than Georgian middle class clerks and the modestly successful.  Camden Rd was no longer grand and there was a problem with brothels around Camden Street and Rousden St.  

As the the last part of the South side was completed in 1848 the industrial revolution was in full swing.

1840

1840

High fashion in 1845

High fashion in 1845